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24 items found:

de FOIGNY, Gabriel. Les Avantures de Jacques Sadeur dans la Decouverte et le Voiage de la Terre Australe. Paris, Michel David 1705. Small octavo contemporary calf. A pleasing copy. Au$2500

This 1705 edition appeared with a multitude of imprints, I stopped counting at eight. They all seem identical but for the name at the bottom of the title page. Half of Paris must have formed a consortium to publish this. Presumably the other half of Paris bought and avidly read it; copies have been long hard to find and good copies doubly so. And who could resist the story of a hermaphrodite serial shipwreck victim carried by a giant bird to a new continent in the south?
This first appeared under the title 'La Terre Australe Connu' and a false imprint in 1676 - one of many reprehensible acts of the feckless disgrace, de Foigny, and the only one he is remembered for now.


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[TYSSOT DE PATOT, Simon.] Voyages et Avantures de Jaques Masse. A Bordeaux, Jaques l'Aveugle 1710 [ie The Hague c1715?]. 12mo modern calf. Title a touch rough around the edge, browning of the earlier sections, a pretty good copy. Au$950

First edition it seems of this imaginary Australian voyage and troublemaking utopia. The bibliographical world has accepted Rosenberg's separation and stretch of the four '1710' editions over four decades, with the first appearing no earlier than 1714 and the last not before 1742. As I have the first, his 'A', I'm hardly going to argue with him.
Early commentators dismissed Tyssot and his book with a snarl: atheistic and scandalous, socialist, meprisable (contemptible), inexpressibly confused; but modern scholars have gone industrial. A quick survey shows the wealth of academic ore mined from Tyssot: Judaism and Enlightenment; Language and the History of Thought; Astronomy, Prophecy and Imposture; Cartesianism and Female Equality; The Ideal Language; Masks, Blackness, Race; Early Deism in France; The Wandering Jew; and I'm sure there's plenty left. I do wonder how many of these scholars read the book: more than one describes a very different book from the one before me.


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[VAIRASSE d'ALAIS, Denis]. Histoire des Sevarambes, peuples qui habitent .. la Terre Australe, contenant une relation du gouvernement; des moeurs, de la religion, & du langage de cette nation .. nouvelle edition, revue & corrigee. Amsterdam, Estienne Roger 1716. Two volumes together in 12mo unlettered sheep (an old repair to the spine, some chipping but solid enough); frontispieces (the same in each volume as is normal) and 8 plates. Au$1150

Maybe the fourth or fifth French edition (there were translations into other European languages) of this fairly famous Austral imaginary voyage and utopia. With new and more plates than earlier editions but I don't know what the advertised revisions and corrections are. Davidson called this "the very rare revised edition" but doesn't elaborate. At the end is a long publisher's catalogue of music.


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[GUERINEAU DE SAINT-PERAVI, J.N.M.]. L'Optique Chinois, Traduit de l'Egyptien. A Londres [Paris], Rey 1765. Octavo contemporary mottled calf (tips worn, front hinge cracked but holding); iv,176;[2],263pp. In two parts, each with a title page. Au$450

Though I've seen this referred to as a reprint of the more elaborately titled 'L'Optique, ou le Chinois a Memphis ..." (1763) I'd be willing to bet that these are the first edition sheets with new title pages. I'll bet this book (and before you take the bet be aware that all the mistakes in pagination are identical). The Chinese traveller in the west is a neat enough conjunction of a number of fashions and Guerineau has tacked together a few in this oriental imaginary voyage cum utopian social satire.


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[BRICAIRE DE LA DIXMERIE, Nicolas]. Le Sauvage de Taiti aux Francais; Avec un Envoi au Philosophe Ami des Sauvages. London [ie Paris], chez Le Jay 1770. Octavo, bound after two other works - both lightweight bits of French froth - in contemporary marbled calf with alternating green and red labels (a bit rubbed). A pleasing copy. Au$2850

First edition of this Tahitian incunabulum - the start of Europe's reverie - a series of letters by a Tahitian visitor to Paris. Which means of course that it is a scathing swipe at French society and politics. Paris had been given the once over by a few fictional Persians, Chinese and other exotics but now not only did they have a 'prince' from the just discovered New Eden but he was real: Aotourou, the Tahitian who accompanied Bouganville to Paris with news of paradise on earth. So how could he not pass judgment? Naturally he chose to do so anonymously and not having more than a few words of French relied on a distinguished man of letters to write them down and fill in the gaps.
I must make it clear that Dixmerie uses none of the typical set dressing employed by authors of fictional authors; I'm doing that. He starts with an editor's account of Tahiti that draws from the only published account so far - that of the voyage's naturalist, Commercon, whose report had appeared in the journal Mercure de France in November 1769. Dixmerie was, by the way, a regular contributor to and editor of the Mercure. Dixmerie says that he could say much more about Tahiti but their Tahitian visitor wants his book to be read and has noticed that the French don't read big books.
Dixmerie's Tahitian stops short of fermenting revolution but he is nonetheless a radical in the manner of many pre-revolutionary troublemakers. His views of women are contradictory, or perhaps confused, but still he advocates equality at all levels. The confusion is understandable. The pre-occupation of the philosophe with the idea of perfect man and that of the rebellious troublemaker with an ideal society not only intersected, they now had the address: Tahiti. The sales rep was in town.
Those who met Aotourou, Dixmerie presumably among them, quickly realised he was no Arcadian but for the rest of France, of Europe, here was ideal man, that is: a man surrounded by amenable young women, nothing much else to do and plenty to eat. In other words the aristocracy. A fair minded egalitarian - a rarer breed than you might think - sees the obligation of including women in this equality business but it's hard when you risk losing that bounty of temporary maidens.


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[ERSKINE, Thomas]. Armata. A fragment. [with] The Second Part of Armata. London, John Murray 1817. Two volumes octavo, together in 19th century half calf, spine elaborately gilded. A bit of browning, a handsome pleasing copy. Au$750

Second editions of both parts. This now obscure Antarctic imaginary voyage to another world connected to ours at the south pole might have been popular, in a mild and genteel way: there were supposedly five editions of the first part in 1817 and the second part likewise reached five editions by 1819. It is possible they were manufactured as part of Erskine’s joke in the preface of part two that histories such as this were doomed to obscurity whereas if he called it a romance it was guaranteed two editions at least by the lending libraries alone. While the first and second edition of the first part are different settings, the second and fourth editions are from the same setting. The first and second editions of part two are from the same setting, as is the fourth edition up until signature K which is where Erskine added some footnotes.
Erskine's Armata is dystopian in intent but he is too polite and good natured to go overboard about it and although a couple of hundred or so sailors, from earth and from Armata, are obliterated at each end of the book they are dispatched in a sentence each. Even the narrator's beloved Morvina, who is literally killed by her induction into society, is done to death in a quiet half page, the narrator apologetic for being tactless enough to mention it. But, skimming past the legal religious stuff - I couldn't follow the outrageous fraud the clergy put over the government and justice system - there are some delightful scenes of bone crunching mayhem once Armata society sets off for an evening out.
Erskine, also now obscure, was once described as the "greatest advocate as well as the first forensic orator who ever appeared in any age" (James High as quoted in Patterson's 'Nobody's Perfect'). He remained all his life a fierce defender of freedom of speech and the liberty of the press with one startling lapse: after defending Thomas Paine at the cost of his own position he prosecuted a bookseller for distributing Paine's writing. Apparently he later returned the retainer in remorse but he remained open to accusations of self interest in that case.


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[Johannes van den Bosch]. de KEVERBERG, [Charles Joseph], Baron. De la Colonie de Frederiks-Oord, et des Moyns ... traduction d'un manuscript u General-Major van den Bosch ... avec une preface. Gand, Houdin 1821. Octavo, uncut and unopened in the remains of original plain wrappers (stitching loose); lxxii,110pp and two plates. Au$950

It has been argued that van den Bosch's Benevolent Society and this first paupers' agricultural colony at Frederiksoord - begun in 1818 - are less an experiment in utopian idealism than the model for the modern prison farm. Certainly from the two plates (one is a plan and view of a colonist's house, the other a birds-eye view of part of the colony) it looks, from this distance, less than utopian. Bleak is the word I'd use. Still, being a Lowlands pauper just after the Napoleonic wars can't have been much of a picnic.
Federiksoord was, to be fair, less punitive than the younger colonies at Veenhuizen where inmates were walled in to prevent escape but, looking at the dreary wastelands of Drente sretching out in every direction, it is hard to imagine where to escape to other than the bottle.
Van den Bosch's record in introducing forced agriculture to the Dutch East Indies has won him few accolades from post-colonial historians but there is no doubt that his intentions here, while hardly charitable, do share some attributes of social reform with contemporaries like Robert Owen.
Baron de Keverberg (Charles Louis Joseph I believe - his younger brother, also Baron, seems to have been named Charles Frederick Joseph; they were both government administrators and active social reformers at the same time but our Baron has the more distinguished history) has added a lengthy preface and notes to his translation of Bosch's manuscript, roughly doubling the work.


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HINGSTON, John. To the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in Parliament assembled, The humble Petition of the Labouring Poor of Great Britain, sheweth, ... Exeter, printed by Featherstone 1827. Two integral foolscap leaves, 4pp with gap left for an address. Folded and addressed, with post marks, to Viscount Milton with the added notation, "Petition of the Labouring Poor from Exeter". A small hole from opening the wax seal. Au$400

A radical, near utopian, demand for the Labouring Poor to have half what they pay in indirect taxes spent for their benefit. The first radical part is in the method of collecting the money: it is to come from what goes to the army and navy and by whacking taxes on the nobility, gentry and landed proprietors. Then we step up a notch. The ten million pounds raised would be handed over to associations of a thousand persons and eventually lead to universal property ownership, the abolition of Negro Slavery and a "revolution ... such as few ever contemplated ... which elevates the mind above all the previous actions of mankind". We finish with a scarely veiled threat about the madness of opposing the masses - "all power flows from them, they are now confident of that power".
Milton, later Earl Fitzwilliam, was long time MP for Yorkshire having been thrust by his father into Parliament when still underage. By 1827 his reputation of obstinancy and impractibility was well established and he and his family were described by Creevey as "
the ugliest and most dismal race I ever beheld". Unlocated in Copac and OCLC.


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Imaginary Voyage. The History of Bullanabee and Clinkataboo, Two Recently Discovered Islands in the Pacific. London: printed for Longman &c 1828. Duodecimo in sixes, publisher's cloth backed boards, printed paper spine label; 216pp. Endpapers spotted but an outstanding, fresh copy. 1829 inscription of C.H. Cruttwell, most likely Clement Henry Cruttwell, master (later headmaster) of Hertford Grammar School. Au$2000

Quite a rare imaginary voyage. The Islands of Bullanabee and Clinkataboo, though close to Hawaii, remain unknown to European navigators but have been trading for centuries with Japan, whose religion the islanders had embraced. As Japan was even more a mystery than Hawaii and other Pacific cultures this all allows a curious mix of supposition drawn from Asia and elsewhere, and imagination.
This imaginary Japanese religion bears a remarkable likeness to Catholicism with its idol worship, the priesthood's love of gold and the supremacy of the head of the church, the sole link of communication to the Goddess Verginee. From the tyranny of this religion comes strife and civil war of course, until sense prevailed and the priests of Verginee were expelled. The cunning and cupidity of the priesthood was relentess though and trouble returns. Again, at last, sense prevails and though devotees of Verginee may persist in their worship they are wisely barred from holding any office of power. And yet again the Verginees wormed their way inside the defences of the too tolerant islanders, this during the author's two year stay, and "in consequence of these sudden and dangerous changes in the affairs of the islands I took the opportunity of leaving them and of leaving them clandestinely for; as all liberality of sentiment was gone and the introduction of a new sort of punishment was in contemplation ... I deemed it prudent to make my escape".


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RICHARDSON, Benjamin Ward. Hygeia a City of Health. London, Macmillan 1876. Octavo disbound; 47pp. Last leaf loose. Au$200

The sanitary reformer's outline for an utopian city of 100,000 people which he is confident that, within two generations, will reduce mortality to five per thousand. An outline it is, but a closely worked one; from the laying out of streets - with subway trains beneath - to their paving and camber. It is to be, more a less, a garden city but the detail is in the details, to coin a paraphrase.
Housing is treated particularly: nothing is to be below ground; the brickwork is to be impermeable but laid with removable wedges that allows cavity air to be flushed or heated; the interior walls and arched ceilings are to be of glazed brickwork (of colours and patterns to the inhabitants' taste and purse) which makes unnecessary the poisons of glues, papers and distempers - and allows the complete interior to be washed down with water. Each room is worked out - by purpose, placement and design; communication and ventilation provided.
Outside, factories, sanitation works, abbatoirs and suchlike are removed some distance from the city and trades (tailoring, shoe-making, lacework) are taken out of the homes to convenient blocks of offices and workrooms. Small, almost portable, model hospitals are provided every few blocks and the insane, infirm and incapacitated are cared for in houses indistinguishable from the rest. Given the debate on cremation vs burial, Richardson plumps for tradition but not current practice. The dead are to be interred in shrouds only into artificial carboniferous soil where they can return to dust in no time at all; monuments can be erected in some hall or temple.


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RICHARDSON, Benjamin Ward. Hygeia a City of Health. London, Macmillan 1876. Octavo publisher's printed tangerine wrapper (rubbed, worn along the spine); 48pp. A bit used; pretty good. Au$350

The sanitary reformer's outline for an utopian city of 100,000 people which he is confident that, within two generations, will reduce mortality to five per thousand. An outline it is, but a closely worked one; from the laying out of streets - with subway trains beneath - to their paving and camber. It is to be, more a less, a garden city but the detail is in the details, to coin a paraphrase.
Housing is treated particularly: nothing is to be below ground; the brickwork is to be impermeable but laid with removable wedges that allows cavity air to be flushed or heated; the interior walls and arched ceilings are to be of glazed brickwork (of colours and patterns to the inhabitants' taste and purse) which makes unnecessary the poisons of glues, papers and distempers and allows the complete interior to be washed down with water. Each room is worked out by purpose, placement and design; communication and ventilation provided.
Outside, factories, sanitation works, abbatoirs and suchlike are removed some distance from the city and trades (tailoring, shoe-making, lacework) are taken out of the homes to convenient blocks of offices and workrooms. Small, almost portable, model hospitals are provided every few blocks and the insane, infirm and incapacitated are cared for in houses indistinguishable from the rest. Given the debate on cremation vs burial, Richardson plumps for tradition but not current practice. The dead are to be interred in shrouds only, into artificial carboniferous soil where they can return to dust in no time at all. Monuments can be erected in some hall or temple.


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Sugiyama Tojiro. [Bunmei no Hana] A Fine Story of Womans Right - the Flower Civilization [sic]. Tokyo, Kin'odo 1887 (Meiji 20). Octavo (19x13cm) publisher's colour illustrated boards and cloth spine; two single page and four double page illustrations. Expected browning of the paper, a fabulous copy. Au$1300

First edition of this remarkable utopian novel of women's rights in which a couple work towards and see the establishment of two equal parliaments, one for women and one for men. This was written in the period of anticipation for Japan's first parliament, scheduled for 1890. Radical as Sugiyama was, there is a sting in the tail for current feminists: Sugiyama is clear that women should be equal to men in all things right up until they get married. Equality for men and women does not mean equality for husband and wife.
Sugiyama published a rush of novels and political writing in the late seventies and eighties. These days he has been exhumed and is kept busy being rediscovered as a science fiction writer.
This is a 'ball cover' (boru hyoshi) book - a signal of modernity and the Japanese equivalent of a yellowback: flimsy western style bindings with lithograph covers that rarely survive in such good shape. Worldcat finds two locations for this, the National Diet Library and Berkeley.


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CLIFFORD, Fred. Chudleigh. New Italy: A brief sketch of a new and thriving colony founded and established by the Italian immigrants who were sufferers by the Marquis De Ray's New Ireland colonization scheme. Sydney, Govt Printer 1889. Large octavo publisher's flush cut roan, front cover titled in gilt; [6],30pp & folding map. The title is headed: 'Richmond River District of New South Wales'. As foolishly indulgent as it may seem for such a slender book the edges are marbled. Mackaness copy with his bookplate. Au$750

This settlement in north east New South Wales must be the first concentrated settlement of Italian agriculturalists in this country. Until recent years this particular aspect of the aftermath of the Marquis de Ray debacle was neglected in most things on the affair - Niau, the daughter of a French survivor, pretty well ignores the Italians in her history 'The Phantom Paradise'.
Irrespective of the appalling adventure that led the Italian survivors to the district, New Italy was possibly the most successful semi-utopian communal settlement in Australia. Clifford, who came across the isolated settlement by chance, gives the background, a good account of their virtues and achievements (extolled as models), and their names. His particular interest in viticulture and fairly prolonged discussion of it also makes this necessary for any serious collection of Australian wine books.
Journalists who followed Clifford to New Italy were less enthusiastic about describing a thriving success but their criticisms were directed at the authorities, not the settlers.


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[LANE, William]. The Workingman's Paradise: an Australian Labour Novel. By John Miller. Sydney, printed by Edwards Dunlop for the Worker Board of Trustees 1892. Octavo publisher's red cloth blocked in blind. Title browned by the endpaper as usual; there was no half title or blank between them. A rather good copy. Au$850

First edition of this influental if fairly impenetrable socialist anarchist novel by the Messiah of the working class. The 1948 edition was on the shelf of every thoughtful Australian in the second half of the 20th century but I've only ever met one person who insisted he read the whole thing. He made many improbable claims. I think an earlier generation were more thorough: copies of this in good shape have always been hard to find.
Lane's preface admits that it's a bit of an unresolved mess but those who want a happy end - like his wife - and those who want Nellie dead of a broken heart - like an unnamed friend - will have to wait for the next book. I dozed off so I'm not sure when the action switched from Nellie to Ned alone and don't know where we left her.


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MURPHY, G. [George] Read. Beyond the Ice. Being a story of the newly discovered region round the north pole. Edited from Dr. Frank Farleigh's diary. London, Sampson Low & Melbourne, Hutchinson [1894]. Octavo publisher's illustrated blue cloth (two small blobs of wax on the front cover, marks on the back). Somewhat canted, not a bad copy of a book guaranteed to respond badly to handling. A signed presentation, dated March 1894, from Murphy to Geelong lawyer Aurel Just, "gentleman, Dremanist and possessor of other titles," with a quote from his character Vernon Dreman. Au$950

Only edition of this polar utopia and dystopia which Murphy - I suspect simple perversity - took to the opposite end of the world in defiance of the usual Australian practice of heading south. Heaps of scientific advances and flying machines as expected but reform and enlightened progress can only go so far: adult women are enfranchised until they marry, then the possible conflict between husband and wife is not worth the candle.
"The chief characters seem to spend a deal of unnecessary time in consuming oysters and brown bread" warned the North Melbourne Courier and West Melbourne Advertiser in an otherwise warm review
while suggesting it would be commercially more canny to set the book in central Australia.


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TUCKER, Horace. The New Arcadia. An Australian story. London, Melbourne &c, George Robertson 1894. Octavo publisher's brown cloth titled in black. Spine canted, minor signs of use. Floridly inscribed and signed by Tucker in 1897 to John Cuthbert Traill and "dedicated without permission to Mrs Traill." Au$350

First edition. More romantic thriller - with murderous, will tampering, downright communist villains - than utopian polemic but a serious utopian novel none the less; unusual for the time in that it is not set in the future, a lost world or another planet. It's the story of a number of idealistic settlements, including Amazona, a women’s community; makes short work of the attempted communist society and ends with the triumph of co-operation. But not so much personal triumph, quite a bit of melodramatic death occurs before then. As one reviewer noted, "the author has an unpleasant knack of killing amiable people."
All this is bound to a material if unsuccessful scheme. Tucker and Charles Strong promoted the resettlement of the unemployed in country areas and between 1892 and 1894 some 200 families were established in Tucker Village Settlements in Victoria. They failed for the usual reasons - lack of capital, a declining economy and mismanagement - but did see the Settlement of Lands Act (1893) enacted. Not in Hubin; it should be.


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ASTOR, John Jacob. A Journey in Other Worlds. A romance of the future. London, Longman 1894. Octavo publisher's blue cloth elaborately blocked in silver and lettered in gilt; 10 illustrations, nine by Dan Beard; 24 page publisher's list dated September 1894 at the end. Edges a bit rubbed and the title page a bit browned. Quite a good copy. Au$125

First English edition, pretty much concurrent with the New York edition. William Waldorf Astor has been described as the richest novelist ever and without knowing the breakdown of the family fortunes I can't argue that, but John Jacob may well be the richest science fiction writer still.
William's pair of novels were no great shakes and neither is this in literary terms. But it is a scientific and utopian romance involving a voyage to Jupiter and Saturn, no worse than most of the didactic science fiction of the period and does provide enough thrills and plenty of monsters. It is set in the year 2000 and Astor's vision of world history over the intervening century can be, with equal or no profit, admired or derided.
Astor was caned by the New York Times reviewer - affronted by his view that time wasted learning the classics would be better spent learning science - who remarked that Astor's description of a "weird scene might also serve in a description of a Dutch Christmas festival".


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GALIER, W.H. A Visit to Blestland. Melbourne, George Robertson 1896. Octavo publisher's green cloth (front board flecked); [8],310pp. Still a rather good, bright copy. Au$350

First edition of this Australian utopian fantasy, of socialist and republican bent the book is dedicated to the 'world's workers'. Though fairly profligate with words the author has economised by embodying the evils of law and religion in one character: the villain is a lawyer who, finding no use for his profession in Blestland, turns to missionising.
Blestland itself is another planet and the advances of the inhabitants are social rather than technological - transport is by unremarkable carriage or train - and there is surprisingly little description of Blestland or its native inhabitants. Instead the action centres around a representative group of troublesome Sydney characters mysteriously transported to the planet, some while boating up middle harbour. And we thought they were living in Castlecrag.


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TAYLOR, William Alexander. Intermere. Columbus, XX. Century Pub. Co. 1901-1902. Octavo publisher's grey cloth; 148pp, frontispiece portrait. An inserted publisher's card advertising the book has made a faint brown patch on the title but this copy is pretty well as new. Au$250

First edition. An Antarctic lost race race utopian thriller. Again a ship, or in this case yacht, is enveloped in fog; comes a mighty storm and the narrator finds himself in an unknown land. Intermere is populated by a physically, mentally, scientifically and socially advanced race. The book exists in a plethora of different coloured cloths but I don't know of any, and don't see any reason to look for, issue points.


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NISBET, Hume. A Dream of Freedom, romance of South America. London, F.V. White 1902. Octavo publisher's illustrated cloth blocked in ochre, white and black; xii,318pp, frontispiece. Some minor browning and signs of use but rather a good copy. Tipped in the front opening is an original photo of Nisbet dated 1901 and a notice of this book. Au$850

Only edition and rare. And rare in more than one sense. It is the only novel that I know of set in the William Lane led utopia of New Australia and Cosme in Paraguay; in fact it is one of very few contemporary books on the settlement (the only other that I know of is the vitriolic 'Where Socialism Failed'; 1912). Likewise it is one of very few novels set in an actual utopia - or at least an attempt at one.
Nisbet's preface is a mildly petulant jab at his critics and sounds a weary note about having written more than forty novels without repeating himself. As his first novel (set in New Guinea) appeared only 14 years earlier it's a not unimpressive achievement on some level. The author of the newspaper notice inserted at the front was alarmed at the implied threat that this could be his last novel and must have been relieved as more novels appeared later the same year. But there weren't many more novels - and they petered out in 1905. In the same month (January 1902) that the freshly widowed Nisbet dates his preface he married a 73 year old widow - 20 years his senior. I wonder whether he was writing with the exhaustion of a new burden undertaken or the release from financial strain.


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CHAMBLESS, Edgar. Roadtown. NY, Roadtown Press [1910]. Octavo publisher's cloth blocked in white with an onlaid colour illustration; [6],172pp. A little flaking of the white blocking, an excellent copy. Au$750

The deluxe issue. For an extra ten cents ($1.35 against $1.25 for plain) you could buy this with the cover illustration hand coloured. Now one of the more arcane and elusive utopian schemes for a new kind of city, leading to a new society. Roadtown is a ribbon, the extreme lineal city. At the bottom, underground, is the railway - noiseless and smokeless - above come housing, work and communal areas - each home with its own plot of land - and at the top is a promenade. In short the perfect blend of the virtues of city and country.
What surprises from this distance is how much apparently sensible support Chambless garnered. Construction was to be prefabricated concrete and Edison donated his patents; transport was by monorail and Boyes donated his patents; there was a pretty impressive list of people lending their efforts, both practical and rhetorical. Ten mile stretches of experimental or exhibition Roadtown seemed likely, even imminent, for years but Chambless beavered away at Roadtown for almost forty years, until his death in 1936, to wind up virtually forgotten.


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GRAHAME, Stewart. Where Socialism Failed. An actual experiment. London, Murray 1913 [1912]. Octavo publisher's cloth; xii,266pp & publisher's list, photo illustrations & map. A rather good copy in what seems to be the original glassine wrapper. Au$175

Second printing; in Murray's Imperial Library. I'm not sure why Grahame (ie Graeme Williams) was quite so bitter about William Lane and his utopian emigration to Paraguay. In this, his most extended revilement (he had already published a couple of pamphlets), Grahame assured his readers that he spent 'over five hundred nights in a mud hut at 'New Australia'' and its easy to conclude that he was a disillusioned settler, but I'm not sure whether that explains the depth of his hatred for any communistic or socialist behavior.


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SLADEN, Douglas. Fair Inez. A romance of Australia. London, Hutchinson [1918]. Octavo contemporary brown cloth (spine lettered and decorated in gilt); 16 page publisher's list for spring 1918 at the end. Front fly removed and inner hinge cracked. Mild natural browning of the paper. Not a bad copy. Au$200

First edition of this futuristic fantasy which opens in the year 2000 with the great airship Murrumbidgee from London coming into land at Melbourne. Returning home is Pat Lindsay Gordon, great-grandson of Adam Lindsay Gordon II, in turn the grandson of a cousin of the revered poet. The Gordons obviously breed hard and fast. His sister Inez will doubtless be the femme fatale of the book. Read on yourself. Was this published in wrappers? I see no other reason for replacing the binding when it must have still been new but I can't find a reference to wrappered copies.


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SLADEN, Douglas. Fair Inez. A romance of Australia. London, Hutchinson [1918]. Octavo publisher's cloth; 16 page publisher's list for spring 1918 at the end. Minor signs of use and some spotting or browning, a pretty good copy. Inscribed affectionately and signed by Sladen in June 1935 to "Dorothy ... another English soul who married an Australian." A small pencil note on the front paste down suggests that Sladen paid 2/6 for this copy in April 1935. If so, he's not the only author to buy their own books to give away. Au$400

First edition of this futuristic fantasy which opens in the year 2000 with the great airship Murrumbidgee from London coming into land at Melbourne. Returning home is Pat Lindsay Gordon, son of Adam Lindsay Gordon IV and great-grandson of Adam Lindsay Gordon II, in turn the grandson of a cousin of the revered poet. The Gordons obviously breed hard and fast. His sister Inez will doubtless be the femme fatale of the book. Read on yourself.


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