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124 items found:

Inigo Jones. WARE, Isaac. Designs of Inigo Jones and Others. London, Isaac Ware [1731]. Quarto contemporary calf (label missing, front hinge cracked but firm); engraved title, 5 engraved pages listing plates on three leaves and 48 plates numbered to 53 (six double page of which five carry two numbers). A rather good copy, fresh and crisp, with the charming armorial bookplate of White of Lincolns-Inn which is handcoloured and touched with gold. I suspect this is William Archibald Armstrong White but there were a few Whites of Lincolns Inn. Au$1500

First edition. Ware's first substantial production as part of the Burlington circle, in a way a popular version of the grander book produced by William Kent in 1727. Here the designs are mostly those of Jones and Kent (one is Burlington's) but a few had not been published before. Eileen Harris pointed out in her note on the William Kent book that its greatest influence is apparent in the use of details - doors, windows, ceilings, fireplaces &c - and doubtless the same claim can be made for this book; there are many fine details.


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CIPRIANI, Gio. Batt. [Giovanni Battista]. Scelta di Ornati Antichi e Moderni. Disegnati ed incisi .. Rome, con permesso 1801. Quarto half vellum (spine label missing, apparently recased at some time); etched title and 61 etched plates with numerous designs. Some spotting or browning but nothing too serious. Au$1250

Immediately attractive and subtly so - partly because this just looks like a rare book. It is a fairly rare book and it is an attractive book of ornamental details for walls and ceilings; most are friezes, there are four urns and a few larger designs. This is not the Cipriani who came to London in 1755 and did the architectural details, just the sort of thing illustrated here, for a number of public and private buildings. Ignore anything different I may have said. This is the younger architect and engraver who worked in Rome from the 1790s until about 1830.


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[HEINE, Johann August]. Traite des Batiments Propres a Loger les Animaux, qui sont necessaires a l'economie rurale;... Lepizig, Voss 1802. Folio (38x27cm) contemporary quarter calf and mottled boards (rebacked with the original spine preserved); xii,72pp and 50 engraved plates including the frontispiece - plans, elevations etc. Foxing, still a crisp copy. Au$1975

First edition - a German translation appeared a couple of years later - of this handsome, thorough, expert treatise on the architecture of animal husbandry. Heine wrote with an even hand on architecture and rural economy or, as here, both. The book begins with a plan and elevation for a house and estate and continues in sections: stables and all the other varied structures for horses; cows; pigs; sheep; birds, ducks and geese; bees; silkworms; and dogs. The bee and silkworm sections go well beyond architecture and could be self contained monographs on apiculture and sericulture.
These are no rustic sheds. These are substantial and considered - quite severe - neo-classical buildings, any one of which would be desirable real estate now. I don't remember another farm building pattern book which insists on applying rules of proportion.


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Architecture. Rudiments of ancient architecture, containing an historical account of the five orders, with their proportions and examples of each from antiques. Third edition, enlarged. London, for J. Taylor, 1804. Octavo modern plain wrapper, xvi, 136pp, 11 engraved plates and 5 vignettes in text. Contemporary inscription of one T. Broadhurst - possibly the Rev Thomas Broadhurst, father of Australian politician Edward; maybe the stonemason Thomas Broadhurst, father of the politician Henry; maybe any of the Thomas Broadhursts who were transported during the first half of the 19th century. See how easy it is to get distracted? Au$90

The primer on classical architecture and the orders for a couple of generations at least, this first appeared in 1789 and was kept in print for some 40 years. The second edition (1794) was decently 'enlarged' but I don't think much changed after that.


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PERCIER, C. & P.F.L. FONTAINE. Recueil de Decorations Interieures, comprenant tout ce qui a rapport a l'ameublement. Paris, the Authors & Didot 1812. folio, uncut in original boards, modern straight grain morocco spine. [4],43pp, 72 engraved plates. Scattered spotting; a rather good copy. Au$1650

Issued in parts from 1801 (has anyone ever seen a set?) This was the apotheosis of the Empire style, by its inventors. The elegant outline plates display interiors and furniture done for Napoleon at the Tuileries, and for clients throughout Europe. But the descriptions make clear that manufacture was by Parisian craftsmen.


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[JACSON or JACKSON, Maria Elizabeth]. The Florist's Manual, or, hints for the construction of a gay flower garden. With observations on the best methods of preventing the depredations of insects. London, for Henry Colburn 1816. Octavo, uncut in publisher's boards with title label on the spine; 74,[2 publisher's list]pp, two folding plans for flower gardens. Rear endpaper removed, still a nice copy. Au$165

First edition of Miss Jacson's most successful book; it ran to at least three editions. According to a great-nephew Maria and her sister Frances took up their pens to bail out their feckless cleric brother, Shallcross; Maria with botany and Frances with novels. It took twenty years or more for Shallcross to drink himself to death so they each wrote four or five books between the mid 1790s and the early 1820s. The booklist at the end announces her sister's new novel 'Rhoda'.
A mix of taste manual and practical gardening this is, according to diligent feminist historians, one of the first gardening books for women written by a woman. Miss Jacson deplores both the habit of ladies leaving the layout of their gardens to the taste of their head-gardeners and the fad for American plants "with their names painted on large headed pegs". Such things "will not produce a gay flower-garden". The consensus is that 'Jacson' is the correct spelling. Librarians of the world take note.


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NICHOLSON, Peter. The Student's Instructor in Drawing and Working the Five Orders of Architecture. Fifth edition, considerably augmented and improved. London, for J. Taylor 1823. Octavo (original?) sheep (neatly rebacked, corners worn); viii,,39pp and 41 engraved plates. Some spotting or browning but quite a good copy. Au$400

Like all of Nicholson's books this was useful and successful; first published in 1795 with six or seven editions over the next 50 years. It remained essentially unchanged after the third edition of 1810 and formed a centrepiece of a builder's or provincial architect's library - particularly in such far-flung places as Ireland and the colonies. John Verge owned a copy of this edition - it is just about the only book known to survive from his library. There was at least one American edition in the thirties. At the end are three designs for doorcases.


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HUNT, T.F. [Thomas Frederick]. Half A Dozen Hints on Picturesque Domestic Architecture in a Series of Designs for Gate Lodges, Gamekeeper's Cottages, and other Rural Residences. London, Longman, Hurst 1825. Small folio, uncut in publisher's boards with printed label on the front (rebacked); [32]pp and 12 litho plates. Foxing but an appealing copy of the issue with proofs on India at 21/-, as opposed to 15/- for standard copies. Au$350

First edition of Hunt's first book, very much an essay in picturesque nationalism, with designs for nine buildings.


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HUNT, T.F. [Thomas Frederick]. Designs for Parsonage Houses, Alms Houses, Etc with Examples of Gables, and Other Curious Remains of Old English Architecture. London, Longman, Rees, Orme 1827. Quarto, uncut in publisher's boards with printed title label on the front (rebacked); [8],34pp and 21 litho plates. Some foxing and a mild tide mark at the bottom of a couple of plates, still a pleasing enough copy. The plates, printed by Hullmandel, are on India, mounted, possibly denoting the proof issue. Au$250

The sequel to Hunt's 'Half a Dozen Hints' (1825), still firmly planted in a pure old England unconfounded by the Gothic. He makes the pointed point that his renderings are uncluttered and unsweetened by "factitious" effects. They are as built, not as they might appear with years of ivy, gardens and mellowing. We need look no further than colleague P.F. Robinson for such abject fiddling.


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ALCOTT, William A. Essay on the Construction of School-Houses, to which was awarded the prize offered by the American Institute of Instruction, August, 1831. Boston, Hilliard Gray &c 1832. Octavo disbound; 66pp, two full page plans. Some spotting or browning but a pretty good copy. Au$300

The first American work devoted to school buildings and their design. Alcott is not celebrated in architectural history, after all he was no architect but an educator, reformer and pamphleteer. But "the characteristic form of schoolhouses was established with the 1832 publication of William A. Alcott's 'Essay on the Construction of School-Houses'. Alcott stressed the importance of light, fresh air, and space in his designs." (Doggett and Wilson). Alcock was not dogmatic about the style of the building but he was about everything else, the site and landscaping, the timber for the floorboards and blackboards, the size and placing of each student's book box, the placing of coat pegs. All was to be healthy, rational, beneficial and beneficent.
The American Institute of Instruction was itself new; this was the beginning of a new movement for universal education. Over the next few years these ideas spread, often in the briefest form: Alcock's plan and key. In 1839 the superintendent of schools in Michigan submitted Alcock's plan with few modifications to the legislature and this was in turn reprinted in a Connecticut journal.


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LOUDON, J.C. An Encyclopaedia of Cottage, Farm, and Villa Architecture and Furniture; .. a new edition; London, Longman &c 1836. Stout octavo contemporary green gilt calf (edges a bit rubbed, a small and inoffensive flaw in the back hinge); xx,1138pp, hundreds of wood engraved illustrations and plans. Quite a handsome copy. Au$975

Probably the fourth edition, and probably much the same as the 'new edition' of 1835, both claiming numerous corrections and re-engraved plates - this refers to the original litho plates that had already disappeared from many copies of the first edition, replaced by wood engravings. Only the first edition had the imprint of Howe in Sydney and Melville in Hobart but nonetheless this book, in all its editions, was the most used architecture book in Australia during the middle of the 19th century.


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FIELD, M. City Architecture; or, designs for dwelling houses, stores, hotels, etc. NY, Appleton 1854. Octavo blindstamped cloth (small chips from the tips); 75pp and 20 plates. An old paper shelf label on the spine and some foxing but quite a good copy. Au$1200

Second printing, it first appeared in 1853. Field argues for the application of Italian forms and proportions to New York City. He begins with a general principles and aesthetics, goes on to a critical review of New York architecture (he had provided such a review some years earlier for Loudon's 'Architectural Magazine') and offers twenty suggestive designs which include banks, an ice-cream saloon, market, railroad terminus and school. He is cognisant of the increasing use of cast iron, though he thinks it has its limitations, and suggests that three of his designs are the type best suited for the material.


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SOMMERFELDT, Hakon A. [& John Grantham]. Atlas to the Elementary and Practical Principles of the Construction of Ships. [bound with:] On Iron Ship Building. With practical examples and details [this latter by Grantham]. London, Weale 1861 & Lockwood 1859. folio (original?) half calf (rubbed, spine ends worn); 10 large folding engraved plates numbered to 14 (4 carry two numbers) & 24 litho plates (11 folding). Spotting & browning, more so in the second work. Au$500

The plates atlases for two shipbuilding treatises in a contemporary binding. Second edition of the latter. Grantham was a pioneer in iron shipbuilding and the text (one of Weale's Rudimentary Series) went into at least five editions. He finishes with three sections (one longitudinal) of the Great Eastern. Sommerfeldt's work is more classic offering examples of merchant ship, clipper, an East Indiaman, a 52 gun steam frigate, and a river steamboat.


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RUSSELL, J. Scott. The Modern System of Naval Architecture. London, Day & Son [1865]. Three volumes large atlas folio modern half calf and cloth; large folding plate as a frontispiece in volume 1 (the text volume) and 167 plates, most double page or larger, some very large indeed, in the two volumes of plates. Title and following two leaves of the text volume creased, miniscule blindstamps in the margins and creeping dust into the margins of the plates in volume three (easily cleaned away by anyone with patience); two plates misfolded. In all a very good, remarkably good, copy. Au$9500

The Great Eastern of naval architecture books, a description I read somewhere which is true enough except that Russell's book has a happier history than his ship. Published at 40 guineas this was certainly a massive venture and of course offers an impressive record of the Great Eastern among the wide range of ships described and illustrated (these include plates of a screw steamer for the Australian trade of which five were built).
Despite Russell's impressive list of achievements he never quite attained or held onto the success he probably deserved. Apparently this was largely due to the fact that he was 'not quite a gentleman'.


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Woogaroo lunatic asylum. Report from the Joint Select Committee on the Woogaroo Lunatic Asylum, together with the proceedings ... and minutes of evidence. Brisbane, Govt printer 1869. Foolscap disbound; [4],73pp and nine litho plates: plans and elevations. Au$450

Woogaro, Queensland's first lunatic asylum, was opened in 1865 and was a disaster: built in the wrong place, badly staffed, badly managed, with woefully inadequate buildings. Two inquiries were held in 1869, one by public servants and this one by a parliamentary committee. The focus here is on the buildings, the general plan and proper management. From this inquiry came the 1869 Lunacy Act. The committee recommend buildings on the "cottage" system and given the choice between plans by Tiffin and Suter - illustrated here - chose Suter's. He crammed twice the number of patients into each building at a saving of £18 per head.


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EASTLAKE, Charles L. A History of the Gothic Revival. An attempt to show how the taste for mediaeval architecture .. has since been encouraged and developed. London, Longmans &c 1872. Octavo half crushed morocco by Wood, spine amply gilded; xvi,430pp, 36 wood engraved plates, illustrations in the text. The original cloth from the spine and covers are bound in at the end. Blanks after the marbled endpapers browned but otherwise gleaming; a particularly luxurious copy. Au$500

The essential contemporary survey of gothic revival by one of the biggest of its wigs.


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ALLEN, Charles Bruce; Murata Fumio & Yamada Koichiro. [Seiyo Kasaku Hinagata]. Tokyo, Gyokuzando 1872 (Meiji 5). Four volumes 23x15cm publisher's wrappers with printed title labels. Illustrations through the text and full page plates - copper engravings. A most restrained nibble to the very edge of the cover and first few pages of one volume; a rather good copy. Au$1250

The first western architecture book published in Japan. I'm intrigued by the choice of the modest 'Cottage Building, or hints for improving the dwellings of the labouring classes' - one of Weale's utilitarian Rudimentary Treatises. Why not European grandeur? American mass production? Allen's small book first appeared in 1849-50 and remained in print, progressively updated, into the 20th century. This translation was made from the 1867, sixth edition.
A sensible enough choice I guess but when has sense played any part in the introduction of new ideas? Murata Fumio edited 'Seiyo Bunkenroku' (1869 &c) - based on the reports of the Takenouchi mission of 1862 - which focused on England so the connection is clear enough. That there was any significant group pushing for philanthropic reform this early in the Meiji restoration comes as a surprise to me; perhaps this book was chosen as a slap in the face to the opponents of westernisation and modernisation. Ostensibly it was a response to the 1872 Tokyo fire. Allen's book was given by an Englishman to the translator as useful for information on fire-proof buildings. Could it be that simple?
Worldcat finds no copies outside Japan, a search of the specialist libraries I can think of found no more.


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Catalogue - tiles. Minton, Hollins & Co. Stoke Upon Trent. [Catalogue of art-painted tiles, enamelled tiles and embossed Majolica tiles]. Minton Hollins c1873. Small folio (33x22cm) publisher's cloth backed printed boards (ink stain on front cover); 2pp and 25 chromolitho plates, 12pp price list loosely inserted. Minor signs of use, the ink stain apart a rather good copy. Au$2750

Here we have the arty tiles those for walls, surrounds and so on. Encaustic and paving tile patterns were available separately from the company. Around 1870 there was a split between the partners of Minton and for a short while there were two companies making Minton tiles until a law suit settled the matter. Hence the stern declaration on the cover - and the price list - that the patents and the name belong this firm. Both cover and price list include their 1873 Vienna exposition medal and a slip added to the price list announces a price rise in August 1872 - 10% will be added to the prices here.
Maybe once a week for years and years - this was a long time ago when I kept shop with open doors in Sydney - an unappealing man would come in and ask if we had a 19th century Minton tile catalogue. When I said no, he said, "I do." I think he had some job that would be unspeakably dull but that it allowed him to tour the bookshops of greater Sydney assuring us all that he had a Minton tile catalogue. The last time I went to a Sydney book fair there he was, asking the same question with such anticipation that he barely paused for the answer before his inevitable boast. I don't remember his name, I don't know if he's still alive and I have no wish to see him ever again but still, still, I would like to say, "Why yes, yes I do".


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HULME, F. Edward. Suggestions in Floral Design. London, Cassell [1878]. Folio modern half morocco (original decorated cloth front panel bound in at the end); 52pp and 52 chromolitho plates (including the title and end leaf). Some minor flaws: a stain in the bottom margin of the last couple of leaves of text, a couple of rumpled page edges and repairs to tissue guards; still rather good, clean and unfoxed. Au$1100

Hulme is mostly remembered as an art-botanist and ornamental encyclopaedist and perhaps his name has been blackened by dreary, usually incomplete, sets of 'Familiar Wild Flowers' choking the bookshops of the world. His skill as designer has been unjustly neglected and this, his most exciting book, makes that clear. The influence of his teacher and colleague Christopher Dresser is obvious in the forms and flat bright colours but that is no curse. The accompanying text is plain and helpful and the plates are beautifully printed by Dupuy of Paris.


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LACROUX, J. Constructions en Briques. La Brique Ordinaire, au point de vue decoratif. Paris, Ducher, 1878 & Daly, n.d. Two volumes folio later quarter crimson morocco; [8],43; [2,2]pp, 155 chromolitho plates, illustrations in the text. Occasional browning, a handsome copy. Au$3000

The greatest of the brick books, one of the monuments of chromolithography, and a useful pattern book. With almost every conceivable pattern type in multi-coloured brick, and their application in various projects - enclosure walls, factory chimneys, stables, a pigeon house, an orangerie, town houses and country villas. Most are in scaled plans and elevations, some with perspective views, all with locations and architects named. The second volume (printed by Lemercier, the first is by Monrocq) mostly contains large Parisian houses or villas, again with plans, sections (often indicating styles of furnishing), elevations and perspective views, all identified.


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AUDSLEY, W. & G. [William & George]. Polychromatic Decoration as Applied to Buildings in the Mediaeval Styles. London, Sotheran, 1882. Folio publisher's gilt cloth (wear to tips); [8],32pp and 36 chromolitho plates interleaved with descriptive text. Light browning, quite a good copy. Au$450

Careful and plain descriptions and practical advice accompany the sometimes spectacular designs. A chart offers the colours and tints most suitable for decorative painting and patterns are grouped for specific wall areas and features. At the end are four plates of alphabets.


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Architecture. Office Buildings [cover title]. A compilation of plates from the American Architect & Building News and some from the Architectural Review. n.p. [1885-1901]. Folio (34x24cm) contemporary half morocco (scuffed, front hinge cracking but solid enough); 146 plates mounted on stubs, some double page, a couple colour. Au$2250

A marvellous collection of high class plates from high class journals of new and planned buildings at the time America was busy inventing the modern city. The first plate is an 1899 elevation of the Boston Woman's Club designed by pioneer woman architect Josephine Wright Chapman in collaboration with her former boss, Charles Blackall. This was never built but the Worcester Woman's Club designed a couple of years later by Chapman is a truncated, refined version.
I'm near convinced this is a publisher's or bookseller's compilation, particularly since these are Boston plates in a Boston binding by Holzer. These plates were never disinterred from some pile of magazines. Plates could be bought singly or by subject from good journals, and publishers and proper booksellers offered compilations to order. What is special here is the office. I've never seen another like this and a run through the illustration lists of the journals through this period show that office buildings - despite transforming cities - were under represented compared with things like churches and country houses.


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Yamanaka Kichirobe. [Moyo Hinagata Naniwa No Ume]. [Tokyo or Osaka 1886?]. Small quarto by size (245x185mm) publisher's decorated wrapper (not a printed title slip; spine backed with Japanese paper some time ago); colour woodblock title, three pages of text, two colour woodblocks of kimonoed women and children, 60 colour woodblocks of kimono designs, one with added embossing, on double pages in the long antiquated reverse form: folded in the gutter and pasted together at the outside edge. Au$850

I'd say that this is the first of three volumes of a pattern book of Osaka kimono designs but it it isn't quite. The copy of Moyo Hinagata Naniwa No Ume in three volumes that I've found is clearly labelled first, middle and last on each wrapper title, does not have the three introductory pages of text that are in this, and the last four plates in this are the first four in the second volume. To complicate this more, Yamanaka published a remarkably similar kimono pattern book in Osaka the same year with title that indicates it is the latest designs from the city.
The peculiarities of the binding could lead to a long and inconclusive discussion of issues, regional distribution, remainders and mistakes; perhaps these things were put out in forms to fit every pocket and taste.


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Hayashi Tamiji. [Kibutsu Zushiki - Vessel Patterns (more or less)]. Tokyo, Hayashi Tamiji 1888 [Meiji 21]. 245x180mm publisher's wrapper with printed label (sometime rebacked with rice paper and since split down the spine); [2]pp, one single and 51 double page litho plates. Bound as an accordian fold, with one plate separated down the fold. Signs of use but pretty good for a book virtually guaranteed to be used to pieces. Au$600

An intriguing thing: a lithographed pattern book for export ceramic ware and very much a working book. Essential at the time when Japanese manufactury moved from craft to industry with the introduction of plaster casting, transfer printing and so on. Pots, cups and saucers, jugs, vases, urns, bowls ... some items are shown decorated, some show enough decoration to be a guide and many are outline plates - some at full scale - to get the form right. Getting the form right was the important bit at this point, pattern books for decoration were plentiful.
This has the look of being adapted from a Chinese work - which makes sense, the Chinese had a long established export market, and some of the forms here are already a century old - but I can't trace what that may be. Nor can I find much about this; Worldcat finds one copy, in Chicago, and further searches find only the National Diet Library copy.


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Ishii Usaburo. [Shinsen Taisho Hinagata Taizen]. Osaka, Seikado 1897 [Meiji 30]. Six volumes small quarto by size, publisher's embossed wrappers with title labels; illustrations throughout, a couple folding - all lithographed. The cover surfaces well grazed by insects, excellent inside; a rather good set. Au$850

First edition of this excellent builder/architect's pattern book - it was reprinted in 1910 - published just at the time when there was both a cultural argument and a government led reaction against the wholesale importation of western architecture into Japan. This particular book bridges the confrontation between a nationalistic return to ancient temple forms and the fervour for modernisation. Two thirds of this book is traditional Japanese design, structure and carpentry but the last two volumes introduce western building designs and, in the details, western building methods. Here nuts, bolts and metal brackets replace traditional carpentry and masonry forms are described. In the last volume are a series of profiles of mouldings, architectural hardware and fairly elaborate gates, fences and entries in western styles.
At this time architecture itself was an innovation - the first generation of trained architects were beginning to replace the craftsman, until then designer and builder. But the Imperial Palace, despite the Emperor's push for modernity for the country, was not built to the designs of any of the western or western trained architects who submitted designs; it was built by the Imperial Carpenter, who went on to teach many of these young, new architects then, in turn, responsible for the resurgence of Japanese historicism.


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